It was last sighted over the target and had been struck by parts of an enemy fighter. B-29 42-6368 was flying in # 4 position of a four-ship diamond formation. Lead B-29, 42-6334, was struck head-on by an enemy fighter and exploded. A piece of the wreckage struck the tail (vertical stabilizer) of 42-6368, separating it. 42-6368 was last seen in a spin over the target (MACR 9685). TSgt Dansby wrote that there was a report of six parachutes from 42-6368. Dansby bailed out at about 3,000 feet. He believed that the others who were able to bail out included Newman (at about 14,000 feet) and Shott (at about 20,000 feet). Capt. Dexter C. Dean of the squadron informed reporter of this. Three were in the POW prison camp in Japan. Dansby was kept in solitary confinement for four months then was sent to the Tokyo Omari POW prison camp. Col. Carmichael Richard was brought to the POW prison later. When the war ended, there were about 150 B-29 crewmen who were in the Omari prison camp. 1stLt Newman was captured and a POW of the Japanese until their surrender. He died 2 April 2003 and is buried in the Crawford St. Memorial Park, Roxbury, Massachusetts.

BLOOM, BEN RALPH, Second Lieutenant, # 0-739536, USAAF

 

Ben Ralph Bloom was born on 21 August 1919 in La Junta, Otero Co., Colorado, to Morris Bloom (1895-1972) and Sadie Tillie (Cohen) Bloom (1898-1962) emigrated 15 March 1909, Romania -Russia – naturalized) (married 8 Oct 1915 - NJ). Rosemary B. (Bloom) Murphy (1916-2003) (VA), Estelle M. (Bloom) Gates (1930-2014) (CA).

 

He registered for the WW II draft in 1940 as a University of Colorado student and described himself as 5’6”, 165 lbs, with brown hair and eyes. He enlisted in the USAAF in Colorado, had completed two years of college, on 23 March 1942. He was trained as a bombardier on the B-29 Superfortress. He was sent overseas to 20th Air Force in India then to an advance base in China. From there they flew missions in China and over Japan. On 20 August 1944, a B-29, # 42-6368, “Calamity Sue,” assigned to 20th Air Force, 468th Bomb Group, 794th Bomb Squadron, departed the airfield at Pengshan, China, on a bombing mission of the iron and steel works at Yawata, Kyushu, Japan, from 26,000 feet altitude. It was last sighted over the target and had been struck by parts of an enemy fighter. B-29 42-6368 was flying in # 4 position of a four-ship diamond formation. Lead B-29, 42-6334, was struck head-on by an enemy fighter and exploded. A piece of the wreckage struck the tail (vertical stabilizer) of 42-6368, separating it. 42-6368 was last seen in a spin over the target (MACR 9685). TSgt Dansby wrote that there was a report of six parachutes from 42-6368. Dansby bailed out at about 3,000 feet. He believed that the others who were able to bail out included Newman (at about 14,000 feet) and Shott (at about 20,000 feet). Capt. Dexter C. Dean of the squadron informed reporter of this. Three were in the POW prison camp in Japan. Dansby was kept in solitary confinement for four months then was sent to the Tokyo Omari POW prison camp. Col. Carmichael Richard was brought to the POW prison later. When the war ended, there were about 150 B-29 crewmen who were in the Omari prison camp. After recovery from Japan, his remains were buried in the B’nai B’rith Jacob Cemetery in Pueblo, Colorado