He enlisted in the USAAF at Camp Grant, Illinois, on 23 February 1942. He was trained in the maintenance and operation of the radio equipment on the B-29 Superfortress. On 20 August 1944, a B-29, # 42-6301, “Wayupinthere,” assigned to 20th Air Force, Chakulia, India, 40th Bomb Group, 25th Bomb Squadron, departed the airfield at Hsinching, China, on a bombing mission to the aircraft assembly plants at Yuwata, Japan. A crash was reported 45 miles south of Kunlien, China. A plane had crashed and burned at roughly 170 miles south of Hsinching, China, at about 2200 on 20 August 1944 and was identified as 42-6301. All crew members were killed. Eleven bodies were found and buried in separate graves by the Chinese. Last contact was by radar over Yellow River. Since radar of that early era was rarely used for guidance, it was believed they ran out of fuel. His remains were recovered from China, buried in the National cemetery in Hawaii then moved to the U.S. mainland for burial. His remains were indistinguishable from other crewmen and they were buried in a single-casket group burial in the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, Louisville, Kentucky, on 17 May 1949 (Sec. E, sites 66-68).

RINGGOLD, EDWARD HILSIMER, III, Sergeant, # 1326005, USAAF

 

Edward H. Ringgold, III, was born on 1923 in Pennsylvania to Edward H. Ringgold Jr. (1901-1951) and Bessie S. (Adams) Ringgold (1904-1973) (both born in PA – married in 1923, Philadelphia, PA). Siblings included Mary Jane Ringgold (1927-    ) (NJ). In 1930, his father managed a sales office. Edward H. Ringgold (Sr.) (1875-1944) (born PA) was married to Sara “Sally” (Field) Ringgold (  . His father was also Edward H. Ringgold (MD) – married to Mary Louise (Hickey) Ringgold (NJ).

 

He enlisted in the USAAF in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 15 October 1942. He was trained in the maintenance and operation of the radar equipment on the B-29 Superfortress. On 20 August 1944, a B-29, # 42-6301, “Wayupinthere,” assigned to 20th Air Force, Chakulia, India, 40th Bomb Group, 25th Bomb Squadron, departed the airfield at Hsinching, China, on a bombing mission to the aircraft assembly plants at Yuwata, Japan. A crash was reported 45 miles south of Kunlien, China. A plane had crashed and burned at roughly 170 miles south of Hsinching, China, at about 2200 on 20 August 1944 and was identified as 42-6301. All crew members were killed. Eleven bodies were found and buried in separate graves by the Chinese. Last contact was by radar over Yellow River. Since radar of that early era was rarely used for guidance, it was believed they ran out of fuel. His remains were recovered from China, buried in the National cemetery in Hawaii then moved to the U.S. mainland for burial. His remains were indistinguishable from other crewmen and they were buried in a single-casket group burial in the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, Louisville, Kentucky, on 17 May 1949 (Sec. E, sites 66-68).

LINTON, ROBERT ARMSTRONG, Sergeant, # 12098604, USAAF

 

Robert A. Linton was born on 10 October 1919 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to William Linton (1886-1953) (PA) and Dora E. (Hagerman) Linton (1887-1940) (MD) (married 5 July 1912, Indiana, PA). Siblings included Mary Letilla (Linton) Deni (1913-    ) and Dora Hagerman (Linton) Scott (1916-2004). His father was an attorney at law with a general practice.

 

He registered for the WW II draft in 1940 and described himself as 6’, 191 lbs, with blond hair and blue eyes. He enlisted in the USAAF in Binghamton, New York, on 3 February 1943. He was selected for and trained in the maintenance and operation of the .50 caliber aerial machineguns on the B-29 Superfortress and he was the designated senior gunner manning the central fire controls on the mission during which he died.