It then made a sudden climbing turn to the left, climed to about 300 feet, then made a diving turn into the ground. It burst into flames when it crashed. The tail gunner was able to escape through his hatch and suffered third degree burns on his scalp and hands. All others were killed. Investigation revealed the B-29 had flown into four trees which were about 35 feet high. Ater recovery from China, his remains were buried in the Old Frontenac Cemetery, Frontenac, Goodhue Co., Minnesota.

 

His father, Richard J. Peterson, born 15 September 1894, served in the U.S. Army (service # 13484224) during WW I from 26 July 1918 and was honorably discharged on  5 July 1919, in the 54th Pioneer Infantry Regiment, Company B. He died 26 September 1959 and is buried in the Old Frontenac Cemetery.

JACKSON, HARRY B., Sergeant, # 36574871, USAAF

 

Harry B. Jackson was born 1924 in Michigan to Dr. Frederick Dundas Jackson, M.D. (1891-1945) and Bernardine Dorothy (Kathe) Jackson (1895-1963) (Chilicothe, OH) (married 12 September 1922, Muskegon, Michigan). Sibling Robert Henderson Jackson (1928-1980) and Joan (Jackson) Baker (1932-    ). In 1930, his maternal uncle, Bertrand C. Kathe (1905-1945) (Germany) lived with them. He was a graduate of Visitation High School and worked for Packard Motor Car Co.

 

He enlisted in the USAAF in March 1943 and was mentioned as a gunner battling swarming enemy fighters over Japan on the bombing mission of 15 June 1944. He had been overseas assigned to 20th Air Force since April 1944. He was trained in the maintenance and operation of the .50 caliber machineguns on the B-29 Superfortress. He served as senior gunner in the fire control compartment on the mission upon which he died. In addition to flying “the Hump,” the 468th Bomb Group B-29 aircraft bombed the enemy in Bangkok, (Siam) Thailand 5 June 1944, mined enemy shipping lanes near Saigon (French Indochina – Annam), Vietnam, and bombed enemy targets in Burma, Siam, Annam, Shanghai, China, Formosa (Taiwan) and Japan. The 468th Bomb Group received a Distinguished Unit Citation for its bombing raid on 11 August 1944 of the iron/steel works, Yawata, Japan. B-29 # 42-6362 flew 27 bombing missions before her last before her last on 21 November 1944. B-29, 42-6362, made a heavy-weight take-off at night without landing lights. Airborne, it climbed to about 200 feet, and slowly descended until almost out of sight from the ATC tower. It then made a sudden climbing turn to the left, climed to about 300 feet, then made a diving turn into the ground. It burst into flames when it crashed. The tail gunner was able to escape through his hatch and suffered third degree burns on his scalp and hands. All others were killed. Investigation revealed the B-29 had flown into four trees which were about 35 feet high.

 

His father served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps, a Sergeant, in WW I. He since wernt to Wayne Medical School and earned his M.D. in 1921; was Assistant Professor of Medicine at Wayne Medical School. 

PEGG, OTIS AVERY, Staff Sergeant, # 34306961, USAAF

 

Otis A. Pegg was born on 6 April 1913 in Kernersville, North Carolina to Avery Athor Pegg (1868-1940) and Emma Esther (Stephens) Pegg (1868-1920) (married 26 August 1900 in Forsyth Co., NC). Siblings included Luther Wade Pegg (1901-1971), Annie Lee (Pegg) Pegg (1903-1988), Norman Oliver Pegg (1905-1979). His father was a carpenter. In 1940, he was living in Winston-Salem, NC, with his brother’s family, Luther W. and Elnora (Nowlan) Pegg (1909-1987), Luther Wade Pegg Jr. (1928-1973), and Richard Edward Pegg (1929-2009).