SHOTT, CHARLES AUSTIN, First Lieutenant, # 0-683156, USAAF

 

Charles A. Shott was born on 3 November 1918 in Butte, Silver Bow Co., Montana, to Charles Abram Shott (1896-    ) and Hazel N. Shott (1898-2003). His sister was Elizabeth Eloise (Shott) Clark (1922-2017).

 

He enlisted in the USAAF at Fort MacArthur, San Pedro, California, on 5 November 1940. He was trained as a flight engineer and had knowledge of the mechanical and electrical parts of the B-29 Superfortress. In flight, he monitored an array of sensors and dials and was responsible for oil and fuel flow. He was sent overseas to 20th Air Force in India and to an advance airfield in China. On 20 August 1944, a B-29, # 42-6368, “Calamity Sue,” assigned to 20th Air Force, 468th Bomb Group, 794th Bomb Squadron, departed the airfield at Pengshan, China, on a bombing mission of the iron and steel works at Yawata, Kyushu, Japan, from 26,000 feet altitude. It was last sighted over the target and had been struck by parts of an enemy fighter. B-29 42-6368 was flying in # 4 position of a four-ship diamond formation. Lead B-29, 42-6334, was struck head-on by an enemy fighter and exploded. A piece of the wreckage struck the tail (vertical stabilizer) of 42-6368, separating it. 42-6368 was last seen in a spin over the target (MACR 9685). TSgt Dansby wrote that there was a report of six parachutes from 42-6368. Dansby bailed out at about 3,000 feet. He believed that the others who were able to bail out included Newman (at about 14,000 feet) and Shott (at about 20,000 feet). 1stLt Shott was captured and a POW of the Japanese from that date to 29 August 1945. He was separated from service in 1947 (active duty) and from the U.S.A.F. Reserves in 1955. Capt. Dexter C. Dean of the squadron informed reporter of this. Three were in the POW prison camp in Japan. Dansby was kept in solitary confinement for four months then was sent to the Tokyo Omari POW prison camp. Col. Carmichael Richard was brought to the POW prison later. When the war ended, there were about 150 B-29 crewmen who were in the Omari prison camp. He retired from Pacific Bell Telephone in 1970. He was survived by his wife, Betty Hebert Shott of Camarillo. He died 10 November 2003 in Camarillo, Ventura Co., California, a resident of Ojai, Ventura Co., California. He was awarded a Purple Heart and the Prisoner of War Medals and other medals and awards.

DANSBY, WALTER ADAMS, Technical Sergeant, # 15099518, USAAF

 

Walter A. Dansby was born on 29 March 1920 in Sooba, Kemper Co., Mississippi, to Charles E. Dansby (1875-1943) and Alice Belle “Allibel” Dansby (1890-    ). Siblings included Charles Eugene Dansby Jr. (1913-2007) and Dorothy Louise Adams (Dansby) Perel (1916-1996). He was married to Mildred Hamilton (Cole) Dansby (1922-1987) (married 22 January 1966 in Tennessee).

 

He enlisted in the USAAF at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, on 20 February 1942. He was trained in the maintenance and operation of the radio  equipment on the B-29 Superfortress and sent overseas. On 20 August 1944, a B-29, # 42-6368, “Calamity Sue,” assigned to 20th Air Force, 468th Bomb Group, 794th Bomb Squadron, departed the airfield at Pengshan, China, on a bombing mission of the iron and steel works at Yawata, Kyushu, Japan, from 26,000 feet altitude. It was last sighted over the target and had been struck by parts of an enemy fighter. B-29 42-6368 was flying in # 4 position of a four-ship diamond formation. Lead B-29, 42-6334, was struck head-on by an enemy fighter and exploded. A piece of the wreckage struck the tail (vertical stabilizer) of 42-6368, separating it. 42-6368 was last seen in a spin over the target (MACR 9685). TSgt Dansby wrote that there was a report of six parachutes from 42-6368. Dansby bailed out at about 3,000 feet.