He believed that the others who were able to bail out included Newman (at about 14,000 feet) and Shott (at about 20,000 feet). 1stLt Shott was captured and a POW of the Japanese from that date to 29 August 1945. He was separated from service in 1947 (active duty) and from the U.S.A.F. Reserves in 1955. Capt. Dexter C. Dean of the squadron informed reporter of this. Three were in the POW prison camp in Japan. Dansby was kept in solitary confinement for four months then was sent to the Tokyo Omari POW prison camp. Col. Carmichael Richard was brought to the POW prison later. When the war ended, there were about 150 B-29 crewmen who were in the Omari prison camp. After liberation from the POW camp and care and treatment, he was returned to duty 21 November 1945 and was honorably discharged on 31 May 1946. He died 17 March 1999 in Tullahoma, Coffee Co., Tennessee, and is buried in Rose Hill Memorial Gardens, Tullahoma, Tennessee.

KEELAN, RAYMOND JOSEPH, Sergeant, # 33367106, USAAF

 

Ramond J. Keelan was born on 20 July 1919 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to John Henry Keelan (1893-1951) and Catherine Marie (Barry) Keelan (1893-1988) (both born in NY). Siblings included John Henry Keelan Jr. (1917-1997) (NY), and Catherine Marie Keelan (1925-    ). In 1950 his parents lived at 8324 Tulpehocken Ave., Montgomery, Pennsylvania.

 

He registered for the WW II draft in 1940 and described himself as 6’, 180 lbs, with brown hair and blue eyes. He had completed three years of college when he enlisted in the USAAF in Allentown, Pennsylvania, on 14 September 1942 and trained through 28 June 1944 in the maintenance and operation of the radar equipment on the B-29 Superfortress. On 20 August 1944, a B-29, # 42-6368, “Calamity Sue,” assigned to 20th Air Force, 468th Bomb Group, 794th Bomb Squadron, departed the airfield at Pengshan, China, on a bombing mission of the iron and steel works at Yawata, Kyushu, Japan, from 26,000 feet altitude. It was last sighted over the target and had been struck by parts of an enemy fighter. B-29 42-6368 was flying in # 4 position of a four-ship diamond formation. Lead B-29, 42-6334, was struck head-on by an enemy fighter and exploded. A piece of the wreckage struck the tail (vertical stabilizer) of 42-6368, separating it. 42-6368 was last seen in a spin over the target (MACR 9685). TSgt Dansby wrote that there was a report of six parachutes from 42-6368. Dansby bailed out at about 3,000 feet. He believed that the others who were able to bail out included Newman (at about 14,000 feet) and Shott (at about 20,000 feet). 1stLt Shott was captured and a POW of the Japanese from that date to 29 August 1945. He was separated from service in 1947 (active duty) and from the U.S.A.F. Reserves in 1955. Capt. Dexter C. Dean of the squadron informed reporter of this. Three were in the POW prison camp in Japan. Dansby was kept in solitary confinement for four months then was sent to the Tokyo Omari POW prison camp. Col. Carmichael Richard was brought to the POW prison later. When the war ended, there were about 150 B-29 crewmen who were in the Omari prison camp.