KENNEDY, EDWARD J., Flight Officer, # T-192545, USAAF

 

Edward J. Kennedy was trained as a flight engineer on the B-29 Superfortress. This required in-depth knowledge of the electrical and mechanical parts of the aircraft. The flight engineer monitored and adjusted an array of dials and switches on the B-29 concerning fuel flow, oil flow, hydraulics and fire control. On 4 November 1944, a B-29, # 42-6370, “Lethal Lady,” assigned to 20th Air Force, the 468th Bomb Group, 793rd Bomb Squadron, one of fifty-three B-29s, departed the airfield at Khargpur, India, on a bombing mission to Singapore Naval Base. 1stLt Eigler was the co-pilot. 1stLt Peterson was the radar operator. The B-29 was returning to its base when it crashed into the Bay of Bengal (MACR 9577). The pilot of B-29, # 42-6582, of the 40th Bomb Group, saw the crash. SSgt Albert G. Seekatz, 37494507, had the last radio contact. Searches for the wreckage and any survivors were conducted by four aircraft and one Catalina aircraft, sweep searching the area of the crash. No crewmen were found. Airmen in B-29, 42-6582, 40th Bomb Group, at 2030 Zulu, saw a B-29 explode and crash into the Bay of Bengal at 11º 17’ N - 94º 14’ E, near the Andaman Islands. On this B-29s return trip from the mission, saw red and green flares. SSgt Seekatz, radio operator aboard B-29 42-6397, received an “Urgent” call from 42- 6370 at 2030 Zulu but no following message was sent. Another B-29 crew, returning from the same mission, saw a yellow life raft with either a mast or a man standing slightly north of the noted bearing. The entire Bomber Command (20th AF) and units of the British Navy conducted a thorough search of the area for several hundred miles around the wreckage location. The search lasted several days. Nothing was found. He is remembered on the memorial wall in the Manila American Cemetery & Mausoleum, Philippines. He was awarded the Air Medal with an Oak Leaf Cluster and the Purple Heart.

GLIBBON, WILLIAM, Sergeant, # 36559274, USAAF  (Surname also spelled GLEBAN)

 

William Glibbon was born on 4 August 1921 in Michigan to Nicholas “Nick” Glibbon (1895-1963) and Anna (Tyndyk)Glibbon (1893-1935) (both born in Poland). Siblings included Helen Mae (Glibbon) Somes nee Reid (1916-2003), Stella Mae (Glibbon) Pearson (1918-2004), Marie Jane (Glibbon) Wilcoxson (1919-2007), Mildred (Glibbon) Cory (1920-1993), and Peter Glibbon (1926-1945).

 

He was trained in the maintenance and operation of the radio equipment on the B-29 Superfor- tress. On 4 November 1944, a B-29, # 42-6370, “Lethal Lady,” assigned to 20th Air Force, the 468th Bomb Group, 793rd Bomb Squadron, one of fifty-three B-29s, departed the airfield at Khargpur, India, on a bombing mission to Singapore Naval Base. 1stLt Eigler was the co-pilot. 1stLt Peterson was the radar operator. Sgt. Glibbon was the radio operator. The B-29 was returning to its base when it crashed into the Bay of Bengal (MACR 9577). The pilot of B-29, # 42-6582, of the 40th Bomb Group, saw the crash. SSgt Albert G. Seekatz, 37494507, had the last radio contact. Searches for the wreckage and any survivors were conducted by four aircraft and one Catalina aircraft, sweep searching the area of the crash. No crewmen were found. Airmen in B-29, 42-6582, 40th Bomb Group, at 2030 Zulu, saw a B-29 explode and crash into the Bay of Bengal at 11º 17’ N - 94º 14’ E, near the Andaman Islands. . On this B-29s return trip from the mission, saw red and green flares. SSgt Seekatz, radio operator aboard B-29 42-6397, received an “Urgent” call from 42- 6370 at 2030 Zulu but no following message was sent. Another B-29 crew, returning from the same mission, saw a yellow life raft with either a mast or a man standing slightly north of the noted bearing. The entire Bomber Command (20th AF) and units of the British Navy conducted a thorough search of the area for several hundred miles around the wreckage location. The search lasted several days. Nothing was found.