42-67633

 

On 24 June 1944, a flight of P-38s departed the 14th Air Force airfield at Suichwan, China, assigned to the 51st Fighter Group, 449th Fighter Squadron, n a course of 270º, Tungcheng to Pingsiang; on a bomb and strafing mission. P-38J-10LO, # 42-67633, was last seen at about 1010 hours local, near Anyuan, southeast of Pingsiang. The P-38J was hit by heavy enemy ground fire, mostly .30 caliber. It was flown by Lieutenant Colonel George B. McMillan, # 0-366348. The witness was 1stLt Arthur N. Arpin, 0-728955.

 

1stLt Arpin reported: He was flying Col. McMillan’s wing when McMillan’s right engine was shot out. It was smoking badly and Col. McMillan said he was going to bail out. Arpin stayed in formation with him. McMillan said the collant was leaking out of the right engine and the oil pressure in the left engine was dropping fast. Eight to ten miles from the target, McMillan said he was going to try bellying into the river. Arpin asked, “How do these things land on water?” Someone said, “Climb out of your parachute.” Arpin started overtaking him and saw him seeming to remove his parachute straps. Arpin passed him and saw that his left engine was frozen and he was losing altitude. Arpin looked back from about 500 feet and the P-38 had crashed in flames about 200 yards south of the river bed. He saw no parachute.

 

MCMILLAN, GEORGE BRAY, Lieutenant Colonel, # 0-366348, USAAF

 

George B. McMillan was born on 13 October 1916 in Winter Garden, Orange County, Florida to Malcolm Yullee McMillan (1885-1955) (So. Carolina) and Mattie Augusta (Bray) McMillan (1891-1951) (FL). Siblings included Neil Yullee McMillan (1913-1992), Lee Malcolm McMillan (1920-1990), Charles Wesley McMillan (1922-2004), Sarah E. McMillan (1927-    ). He was a 1938 graduate of the Citadel.

 

He graduated from the Citadel class of 1938. He was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the USAAF and earned his wings in 1939. He became a WW II ace. At Moffett Field, California, he was a fighter pilot in the 20th Pursuit Group, 55th Pursuit Squadron, and then at Eglin Field, Florida, for the 1st Pursuit Squadron (attached to the later reknown 1st Commando Group). He was “sheep dipped” and joined the American Volunteers Group flying a P-40 in China with General Chenault. He returned to the U.S. when the A.V.G. was disbanded in 1942 then, as a Major, he returned to China in 1943, to the 14th Air Force. He served in the Chinese-American Composite Wing and the 51st Fighter Group. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, he attained his ace status. He was awarded the Bronze Star for Valor, the Air Medal with one Oak Leafe Cluster, the Distinguished Flying Cross, and the Chinese Order of the Cloud & Banner, 5th Class.

 

On 24 June 1944, a flight of P-38s departed the 14th Air Force airfield at Suichwan, China, assigned to the 51st Fighter Group, 449th Fighter Squadron, n a course of 270º, Tungcheng to Pingsiang; on a bomb and strafing mission. P-38J-10LO, # 42-67633, was last seen at about 1010 hours local, near Anyuan, southeast of Pingsiang. The P-38J was hit by heavy enemy ground fire, mostly .30 caliber. In the crash, Lt.Col. McMillan was killed in action. After recovery by Graves Registration, his remains took a circutuous route home, first to Hawaii then to Arlington National Cemetery. He was first buried in the National Cemetery at the Oahu Schofield Barracks Mausoleum the on 12 March 1948, buried in Arlington National Cemetery (Sec. 12, Grave 3375).

 

His brother, Lee Malcolm McMillan, born 30 July 1920, served in the military as well. He died 13 April 1990.