MINO, DANTE, First Lieutenant, # 0-802661, USAAF

 

Dante Mino was born 3 June 1919 in McDowell, West Virginia to Angelo Mino (1877-1938) (Italy – emigrated 15 May 1913 - naturalized 1917) and Mary Belle Mino (1888-1997) (Italy; naturalized; 1940 census shows her widowed). Siblings included Rena Janet (Mino) Turello (1914-1992) and Selmo R. Mino (1924-2013).

 

He enlisted with three years of college completed, in Morristown, New Jersey, in the the Field Artillery of the U.S. Army National Guard at the rank of Corporal on 27 January 1941. Upon being placed on active duty he applied for pilot training and was accepted. He was trained extensively as a B-24 navigator and earned his commission and wings. He was sent overseas to India. On 8 May 1944 a B24J, # 42-73302, assigned to 10th Air Force, 7th Bomb Group, 9th Bomb Squadron, departed the airfield at Pandaveswar, India, on a single aircraft night mine dropping mission in the Gulf of Siam (Thailand). Visibility was 20 to 30 miles. There was no contact by radio and no visual contact by otheraircraft. Major Kellogg was the 9th Bomb Squadron commander. He died in the crash and his body was recovered by the enemy and buried in the naval base cemetery at Sattahieb, Siam (Thailand). The family placed a memorial marker in the Restland Memorial Park, Hanover, New Jersey.

Brother Selmo Mino

NEWMAN, MARVIN L., First Lieutenant, # 0-670214, USAAF

 

Marvin L. Newman was born 12 October 1920 in Bronx, New York City, New York, to Max Newman (1893-    ) (widowed in 1940). A sister was Janet R. Newman (1918-    ). He was married to Sylvia Newman. He was recorded as a Jewish serviceman. He enlisted in the USAAF (enlisted # 12054081) in Newark, New Jersey, on 13 March 1942. He was trained as a bombardier on the B-24 and earned his commission and wings. He was sent overseas to India. On 8 May 1944 a B24J, # 42-73302, assigned to 10th Air Force, 7th Bomb Group, 9th Bomb Squadron, departed the airfield at Pandaveswar, India, on a single aircraft night mine dropping mission in the Gulf of Siam (Thailand). Visibility was 20 to 30 miles. There was no contact by radio and no visual contact by otheraircraft. Major Kellogg was the 9th Bomb Squadron commander. He died in the crash and his body was recovered by the enemy and buried in the naval base cemetery at Sattahieb, Siam (Thailand). The family placed a memorial marker in the Mount Moriah Cemetery, Fairview, Bergen County, New Jersey.