The remains of the crew were buried on 3 September 1949 in a group ceremony in the Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Lamay, Missouri (Sec 82, Graves 58 and 59). His remains were distinguishable from the rest of the crew and were laid to rest in the Golden Gate National Cemetery (Sec. J, Grave 786).

TOMARELLI, JOSEPH A., Private, #13116060, U.S. Army

 

Joseph A. Tomarelli was born on 24 August 1926 in Scranton, Lackawanna Co., Pennsylvania, to William Tomarelli and Ann (Pilotti) Tomarelli.   In 1950, their address was 1829 Prospect Ave., Scranton, PA.

 

He enlisted in the U.S. Army on 29 August 1942. After enlisting as soon as he was eligible to do so, he was trained in the maintenance and operation of anti-aircraft weapons. He was sent overseas to India and assigned to the 669th Anti-Aircraft Battery. On 23 July 1944, a C-47A, # 42-93349, assigned to 10th Air Force, 3rd Combat Cargo Group, 9th Combat Cargo Squadron, at Moran, India, departed the airfield at Dinjan, India, on an air supply mission to Myitkyina, Burma. All squadron aircraft in the area were told to look for the C-47A. A search C-47 searched for 2 successive days – of a 20 square mile area. The area was immediately south of Shadazup, Burma in the Huking Valley. An aircraft was reported down in the area but, the search found nothing. The C-47 wreckage was found after the Japanese surrendered and the indistinguishable remains recovered by Graves Registrations. The remains of the crew were buried on 3 September 1949 in a group ceremony in the Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Lamay, Missouri (Sec 82, Graves 58 and 59).

AAA battalions were also used to help suppress ground targets. Their larger 90 mm M3 gun would prove, as did the eighty-eight, to make an excellent anti-tank gun as well, and was widely used late in the war in this role. Also available to the Americans at the start of the war was the 120 mm M1 gun stratosphere gun, which was the most powerful AA gun with an impressive 60,000 ft (18 km) altitude capability. No 120 M1 was never fired at an enemy aircraft. The 90 mm and 120 mm guns would continue to be used into the 1950s.