A map in the MACR file shows that the crash was just North of the Thi Seingon River between the villages of We ban and Kweindwa, near a tributary of the Seingon River. It was off course, probably taking evasive action from a threat. The remains were indistinguishable from one another, upon and after recovery from Burma and the India Airfield cemetery, so a group burial was arranged in the Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Lemay, Missouri (Sec. 79, Grave 362).

 

His brother, William P. Reusch, born 16 September 1917, registered for the WW II draft at 23 years, served in the U.S. Army during WW II, from 30 April 1943 to 18 September 1943. He died 10 August 1989. 

Richard U. Reusch

HOVICK, HIRAM THORVALD, Technical Sergeant, # 33194728, USAAF

 

Hiram T. Hovick was born on 13 September 1913 in Clarkfield, Yellow Medicine Co., Minnesota, to Nels Torbjorn Hovick (1868-1942) (Norway – immigrated 1888 – naturalized) and Susan H. (Worra) Hovick (1877-1970) (IL – parents from Norway – Hellick [Olesson – 7 children) & Sarah Worra). Siblings included Amelia S. (Hovick) Christienson (1907-1994), Noah Sigvald Hovick (1908-1972), Esther Elizabeth (Hovick) Bergo (1911-1967), Ingvald N. Hovick, 1916-1989), Ingrid Alice Hovick (1917-2009), and Rudolph Aaron Hovick (1921-    ). In 1920 his father worked in a real estate office. In 1930, the family lived in Madison, Lac Qui Parle Co., Minn., and his father worked as a painter. In 1940 his parents and Rudolph lived the same home. On 2 November 1943 he married Margaret A.H. Boraas in California.

 

He registered for the WW II draft in 1940 and described himself as 6’, 185 lbs, with brown hair and blue eyes. He enlisted in the USAAF at Fort Myer, Virginia, on 11 August 1942. He was trained in the maintenance, function and repair of the mechanical and electrical systems on the C-47. He earned his crewman wings. He was sent overseas to India. On 10 October 1944, a C-47 A, # 43-15812, “Frivolous Sal,” assigned to 10th Air Force, 3rd Combat Cargo Group, 10th Combat Cargo Squadron, departed the airfield at Dinjan, India, on a secret mission to Myitkyina, Burma. It was last contacted by radio on departure from Warzup, Burma, with Cpl. Clarence H. Newcomb, # 33297100, and its destination from Warzup was Myitkyina. It was on a combat mission. Its cargo was unknown to clerical staff. From 10th Combat Cargo Squadron commander to 10th Air Force, dated 12 December 1944: The demolished C-47A was found on 7 November 1944 by a ground party from Headquarters, Air Jungle Rescue Unit, Tingkawk Sakan, Burma. The C-47 was completely demolished from the center of the fuselage to the nose. TThe tail was intact, and the serial number was plainly visible. The rest was gutted by fire. “The pilot, co-pilot and engineer were burned to the point of near cremation.” Nothing was found of the radio operator, Cpl. Maurice P. McKay. A map in the MACR file shows that the crash was just North of the Thi Seingon River between the villages of We ban and Kweindwa, near a tributary of the Seingon River. It was off course, probably taking evasive action from a threat. The remains were indistinguishable from one another, upon and after recovery from Burma and the India Airfield cemetery, so a group burial was arranged in the Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Lemay, Missouri (Sec. 79, Grave 362).