Fire was burning over an area of 300’. Ammunition was exploding. After recovery, his remains were buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Hawaii (Sec. P, Grave 1166). He was awarded the Air Medal and the Purple Heart.

 

His brother, Donald Franklin, born in 1922, served in the U.S. Army from 13 January 1943.

Sadly, a prophetic proverb.

DOYLE, GEORGE EDWARD, First Lieutenant, # 0-766226

 

George E. Doyle was born on 20 December 1919 in Hanover, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, to Bert E. Doyle (1886-    ) (VT) and Lena M. (Berworth) Doyle (1892-    ) (Canada – naturalized). In 1920 they were living with his paternal grandparents, Edward H. Doyle (1861-    ) (VT) and Josephine L. Doyle (1856-    ) (Canada – naturalized). He graduated from Hanover High School and attended the University of New Hampshire. He was married to Miriam Jean (Bevan) Doyle (1920-1988).

 

He registered for the WWII draft on 1 July 1941, resided at 24 School St., Hanover, NH, and described himself as 6’, 170 lbs, with black hair and brown eyes. He noted that he had an appendectomy scar. He completed instruction and flight schools as a bombardier on the B-25 Mitchell. He earned his commission and crewman wings. He was sent overseas through India to China. On 20 June 1945 a B-25J, “Carolyn K,” # 43-27807, assigned 14th Air Force, 341st Bomb Group, 11th Bomb Squadron, Yangkai, China, departed the airfield on a bombing mission to Quang Tri, French Indochina (Annam or Vietnam). It was seen to crash at about 1508 Zulu near Quang Tri (16° 45’ North & 107° 11’ East). 1stLt Ronald E. Irwin, 0-889885, witnessed the crash. He reported that the B-25 came in on a bombing run at 110° across a two-span bridge at Quang Tri. As it came out of its dive, it rocked twice then straightened out 50’-75’ above the bridge. The left wing went down and the B-25 rolled over and crashed inverted, nose first, about 30’ to the left and 100’ past the bridge. It and its bombs exploded in a “terrific explosion” on impact. Flames and smoke rose 500’. Ten minutes later the rest of the B-25 flight overflew the crash at 2,500’. Fire was burning over an area of 300’. Ammunition was exploding. After recovery from Hue, French Indochina, the indistinguishable remains of James Carey, Fred Carey, and George Doyle, were buried in a group ceremony and burial in the Long Island National Cemetery, East Farmingdale, New York, on 12 July 1949 (Sec. J, Grave 14159). He was awarded the Air Medal and the Purple Heart.