Their B-25 turned to a 290º heading and before they were out of sight, the flames died away but they could not see any debris. An attached map showed the crashed B-25 on the west side of the railroad, west of Thitabiyn. After recovery of the indistinguishable remains of most of the crew (Gillooly, Groff, Hampson, Pryor & Wright), except 1st Lt. Schrader, from the American military airfield cemetery at Barrackpore, India, burial was in a common grave in the Fort Scott National Cemetery, Fort Scott, Kansas, on 17 November 1949 (Sec. 2, Grave 1611/12 – 3 caskets).

PRYOR, RAYMOND G., Staff Sergeant, # 6541743, USAAF

 

Richard G. Pryor was born on 26 December 1909 in Texas, to Harvey Gay Pryor (1892-    ) (MO) and Minnie L. Ostrander nee Pryor (Unknown) (IL).

 

On 22 December 1928, he was a Private with the U.S. Army Coast Artillery on the U.S. Army Transport, U.S.S. Somme, departing Fort McDowell, California, for Hawaii. In 1930 he was stationed at Fort Shafter, Honolulu, Hawaii. When he enlisted in the USAAF, he gave his residence as Jackson Co., Missouri. His mother lived in Pocatello, Idaho. He was trained in the maintenance and repair of the mechanical parts of the B-25 Mitchell and earned his crewman wings. He was sent overseas to India. On 27 March 1944, a B-25D, # 43-3616, assigned to 10th Air Force, 341st Bomb Group, 490th Bomb Squadron, departed the airfield at Kurmitola, India, on a medium altitude combat mission over Wuntho, Burma. It was seen to have been hit by enemy fire and crashed at 1115 hours near 23º 21’ North & 95º 31’ East. The witnesses to the crash were 1stLt George F. Smith, 0-793448, and 1stLt Lawrence E. Williams, 0-733502. 1stLt Williams and 1stLt Smith reported that the B-25s were on a strafing mission south along the railroad from Wuntho to Kanbala. The B-25, 43-3616, was smoking lightly from the right erngine before it made a strafing pass on the town of Thitabiyn, then made a controlled right turn. It then went into a glide west at about 300’-500’ and the right engine burst into flames just before the B-25 hit the ground. It crashed near the above coordinateds. There was a terrific explosion when it crashed and the whole B-25 burst into flames with black smoke. Their B-25 turned to a 290º heading and before they were out of sight, the flames died away but they could not see any debris. An attached map showed the crashed B-25 on the west side of the railroad, west of Thitabiyn. After recovery of the indistinguishable remains of most of the crew (Gillooly, Groff, Hampson, Pryor & Wright), except 1st Lt. Schrader, from the American military airfield cemetery at Barrackpore, India, burial was in a common grave in the Fort Scott National Cemetery, Fort Scott, Kansas, on 17 November 1949 (Sec. 2, Grave 1611/12 – 3 caskets).

WRIGHT, DONALD CHARLES, Staff Sergeant, # 32288684, USAAF

 

Donald C. Wright was born on 27 February 1914 in Black River, Jefferson Co., New York, to Benjamin Franklin Wright (1885-1938) and Emily Emma (Zoller) Wright (1887-1932). A brother was Richard H. Wright (1915-1979). He married Gwendolyn E. Stevens in 1941. Living with them in 1915 was his paternal grandmother, Gertrude S. (Hammond) Wright (1844-unknown).

 

After enlisting in the USAAF, he was trained in the maintenance and operation of the radio equipment on the B-25 Mitchell and earned his crewman wings. He was sent overseas to India. On 27 March 1944, a B-25D, # 43-3616, assigned to 10th Air Force, 341st Bomb Group, 490th Bomb Squadron, departed the airfield at Kurmitola, India, on a medium altitude combat mission over Wuntho, Burma.