44-11308

 

On 13 April 1945 a P-51D-5 Mustang, # 44-11308, assigned to 14th Air Force, 311th Fighter Group, 529th Fighter Squadron, Pungchachung, China, departed the airfield at Sian, China, on a strafing mission at Chunting, China. The pilot was 2ndLt Floyd R. Snyder, # 0-1293666.

 

2ndLt Elmer G. Youngblood reported that the flight was on a railroad sweep when 2ndLt Snyder called that he was using too much gas. The flight leader was 1stLt. Wesselkampert. The leader turned north to hit the railroad. Southeast, they saw a train heading for a tunnel. Wesselkamper told Snyer to strafe and firebomb the train. There was no reply and Snyder did not do so. Youngblood strafed the train and noticed that Snyder was not in the flight. They saw a “big fire” about 1 ½ miles southeast and saw an aircraft burning. The circled several times but saw no parachute. 1stLt Wesselkamper reported that they arrived at the railroad just east of Ijanchen. Snyder was on his wing. He called Snyder several times but got no reply. He sent Youngblood to attack. They saw smoke about 1 ½ miles south of the railroad. They saw an aircraft burning but no parachute. 1stLt Wesselkamper was later shot down but evaded capture to return safely.

 

SNYDER, FLOYD R., Second Lieutenant, # 0-1293666, USAAF

 

Floyd R. Snyder was born on 16 October 1917 in Illinois to Elmer Murphy Snyder (1895-1985) (IN) and Louise Marie (Haarer) Snyder (1897-1933) (IL) (married 22 September 1916, Kankakee, IL). Siblings were Patricia Gladys (Snyder) Waring (1919-1998), Dorothy Ella (Snyder) Golding (1922-    ), Edith Helen (Snyder) Hosier (1923-2004), Elmer Murphy Snyder (1929-    )

 

He enlisted in the USAAF in Kankakee, Illinois, on 5 March 1941. After enlisting in the USAAF, he completed flight instruction through advanced school and was assigned to fly the North American P-51 Mustang. He earned his commission and pilot wings. He was sent overseas through India to China. On 13 April 1945 a P-51D-5 Mustang, # 44-11308, assigned to 14th Air Force, 311th Fighter Group, 529th Fighter Squadron, Pungchachung, China, departed the airfield at Sian, China, on a strafing mission at Chunting, China. 2ndLt Elmer G. Youngblood reported that the flight was on a railroad sweep when 2ndLt Snyder called that he was using too much gas. The flight leader was 1stLt. Wesselkampert. The leader turned north to hit the railroad. Southeast they saw a train heading for a tunnel. Wesselkamper told Snyer to strafe and firebomb the train. There was no reply and Snyder did not do so. Youngblood strafed the train and noticed that Snyder was not in the flight. They saw a “big fire” about 1 ½ miles southeast and saw an aircraft burning. The circled several times but saw no parachute. 1stLt Wesselkamper reported that they arrived at the railroad just east of Ijanchen. Snyder was on his wing. He called Snyder several times but got no reply. He sent Youngblood to attack. They saw smoke about 1 ½ miles south of the railroad. They saw an aircraft burning but no parachute. 1stLt Wesselkamper was later shot down but evaded capture to return safely. After recovery from China, his remains were buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Hawaii, on 24 January 1949 (Sec. C, Grave 288).