The Salween River (modernly the Thanlyin River) flows from China South, along the border with Thailand and through Burma. It empties after much meandering through jungle into the Andaman Sea where sits the modern city of Mawiamyine, Burma and Bilugyun (Island). A radio-gram from Air Jungle Rescue disclosed that the wreckage of the C-47B was found at military map grid NZ 1539. It exploded and was scattered over a large area. The first report was from a British ground search party that found a medical record of Cpl. Claude K. Puckett. A second ground search party found part of the C-47B tail. The party reported that some remains were buried with some personal items. All crewmen perished. The Graves Registration team recovered remains from the crash location and temporary burial at an American military airfield in India and, indistinguishable, the remains were buried in a group (Milford, Ketcham, Perron, and Puckett) ceremony and one casket in the Fort McPherson National Cemetery, Maxwell, Lincoln Co., Nebraska, on 30 August 1949 (Sec. R, Grave 13).

 

His father, born 21 December 1894, registered for the WW I draft on 5 June 1917, served during WW I, a Private First Class, # 2242995, 17th Field Artillery, 2nd Division, Headquarters Company, from 22 September 1917 to 16 July 1919. He died on 15 November 1955 and is buried in the Cherokee Memorial Park, Lodi, San Joaquin Co., CA.

PERRON, CHARLES ANDREW, JR., Sergeant, # 38542256, USAAF

 

Charles A. Perron was born in 11 February 1918 in Port Arthur, Harris Co., Texas, to Charles Andrew Perron (1886-    ) (Patterson, LA) and Vera Elizabeth (Smith) Perron (1894-1952) (LA). Siblings included Hayden Kenneth Perron (1920-1992). Living with them in 1930 were his maternal grandmother, Eleanor Smith (1870-    ) (widowed) and a maternal aunt, Winona E. (Smith) Babin (1911-1938). He completed two years of college. His father was a painter in 1920, resided at 1533 10th, Port Arthur, Texas, on 5 June 1917.

 

He registered for the WW II draft on 16 October 1940, resided at 1325 Packard, Houston, Texas, employed at Reed Roller-Bit Co., and described himself as 5’11”, 188 lbs, with brown hair and blue eyes. He wore glasses. He enlisted in the USAAF in Houston, Texas, on 25 August 1943. He was trained to maintain and repair the mechanical parts of the C-47 Skytrain (Engineer) and was sent overseas to India. On 15 May 1945, a C-47B, # 44-76649, assigned to 10th Air Force, 3rd Combat Cargo Group, 9th Combat Cargo Squadron, Warazup, Burma, departed the airfield at Chanyi, China, on an air supply mission to Myitkyina, Burma. The crew was killed when the C-47B crashed into a mountain during IFR flight. The last to see the C-47B was 2ndLt Arthur B. Baldwin, 0-704357. 2ndLt Baldwin was flying within sight of Capt. Milford when they entered IFR conditions at the Salween River. Capt. Milford turned North while 2ndLt Baldwin turned South. A radio-gram from Air Jungle Rescue disclosed that the wreckage of the C-47B was found at military map grid NZ 1539. It exploded and was scattered over a large area. The first report was from a British ground search party that found a medical record of Cpl. Claude K. Puckett. A second ground search party found part of the C-47B tail. The party reported that some remains were buried with some personal items. All crewmen perished. The Graves Registration team recovered remains from the crash location and temporary burial at an American military airfield in India and, indistinguishable, the remains were buried in a group (Milford, Ketcham, Perron, and Puckett) ceremony and one casket in the Fort McPherson National Cemetery, Maxwell, Lincoln Co., Nebraska, on 30 August 1949 (Sec. R, Grave 13).