The C-46D flew through the Hump but when it was over Dinjan, the pilot could not see the field from low altitude and was diverted to Chabua, India. He answered over the field at Chabua and was low on fuel. He was seen by air traffic control at Chabua. He was cleared for an immediate landing. However, the C-46D did not land. The C-46 crashed and the crew killed. After recovery, his remains were buried in the Union Baptist Church Cemetery, Lenoir, Caldwell Co., North Carolina.

 

His brother, William Charles Harless, born 22 February 1926, served in the U.S. Navy from 28 July 1943 to 10 April 1946. He died 4 May 1987.

GLAUB, MILTON EUGENE, Sergeant, # 37576738, USAAF

 

Milton E. Glaub was born on 17 July 1925 in Fond De Lac, Wisconsin, to Edward John Glaub (1898-1968) and Mildred Elizabeth (Benzel) Glaub (1901-1982). Siblings were Edward Albert Glaub (1923-2005) and Betty J. Glaub (1929-    ).  Living with them in 1930 were cousins, James Frank Glaub (1908-1966) and Margaret Glaub (1909-    ). He graduated from Patrick Henry High School.

 

He registered for the WWII draft on 17 July 1943, employed by Raymond Bros., resided at 4031 Emerson Ave., North Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minn., and described himself as 5’7”, 145 lbs, with brown hair and hazel eyes. He noted that he had a scar on his right thumb. After enlisting, he was trained to maintain and operate the radio equipment on the C-46 Commando. He earned his crewman wings. He was sent overseas to India. On 1 August 1945 a C-46D Commando, # 44-78200, assigned to 10th Air Force, 443rd Troop Carrier Group, 315th Troop Carrier Squadron, Dinjan, India, departed the airfield at Kunming, China, on a flight through the Himalayan mountain range (the Hump) on a return to Dinjan, India. The C-46D flew through the Hump but when it was over Dinjan, the pilot could not see the field from low altitude and was diverted to Chabua, India. He answered over the field at Chabua and was low on fuel. He was seen by air traffic control at Chabua. He was cleared for an immediate landing. However, the C-46D did not land. The C-46 crashed and the crew killed. After recovery, the remains of 1stLt Boggus and Sgt. Glaub were indistinguishable and were buried together in the Rock Island National Cemetery, Rock Island, Illinois, on 9 December 1949 (Sec. E, Grave 27).

 

His father, born 17 January 1897, served in the U.S. Navy, BKR1 (Baker 1st Class), during WWI. He died 14 July 1968 and is buried in the Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Sec. P, Grave 3207).

 

His brother, Edward A. Glaub, born 9 November 1923, served in the USAAF, Private First Class, during WWII. He died 19 July 2005 and is buried in the Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Sec. 16, Grave 377-C).

His cousin, James F. Glaub, born 22 March 1908, served in the U.S. Army, Private, from 15 March 1942 to 3 December 1943. He died 1 October 1966 and is buried with his wife, Dorothy Maurine Glaub (1915-1993) in the Willamette National Cemetery, Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregon. The 6th Infantry Division of World War II holds the unchallenged record for consecutive days of continuous combat in the Pacific Theater, 219 days of continuous combat, set by the Division on the Island of Luzon, the Philippines. At the end of World War II, the Division’s men were the most heavily engaged troops in the United States Army still fighting Yamashita’s men in the Cagayan Valley of Northern Luzon. During the War, the men of the 6th Division fought a total of 306 days of combat.